strike

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strike is one of the 1000 most common headwords.
strike

Pronunciation[change]

Verb[change]

Plain form
strike

Third person singular
strikes

Simple past
struck

Past participle
struck

Present participle
striking

  1. (transitive) When you hit something, you strike it.
    If you strike a person, it will hurt.
    He struck the boy with his hand.
  2. When an idea strikes you, it occurs to you suddenly or with force.
    To play with fire strikes me as a bad idea.
  3. When a clock rings a bell to tell you the time, the clock strikes the time.
    The children ran out of the school when the clock struck twelve.


Plain form
strike

Third-person singular
strikes

Past tense
struck

Past participle
stricken

Present participle
striking

  1. A disease can strike a person. That person is stricken with disease.
    The child was stricken with a serious blood disease.
  2. When you strike a part from a document, it is stricken from the document.
    The errors were stricken from the dictionary.
  3. When bad luck strikes you, you are stricken with bad luck.

Usage Notes[change]

Most of the time the past participle of “strike” is “struck.” The exceptions are that you can be stricken with guilt, a misfortune, a wound or a disease; and a passage in a document can be stricken out. The rest of the time, stick with “struck.” This rule does not seem to be authoritative. The past participle is stricken.

Noun[change]

Singular
strike

Plural
strikes

  1. (countable) When a group of people stop working to improve or defend their working conditions or pay, they go on strike.
    Every secretary at the company went on strike for better pay.