viable

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Pronunciation[change]

  • IPA (key): /ˈvaɪəbəl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vi‧a‧ble

Adjective[change]

Positive
viable

Comparative
more viable

Superlative
most viable

  1. When something is viable, it can be done or used.
    Jamie came up with a viable plan for getting all of her work done before her vacation.
    If there is a fire, that door will not be a viable exit. It is locked from the outside and we will not be able to get it open.
  2. When something is viable, it can work out well. It can be successful.
    The two countries were determined to work out a viable peace deal to stop the war.
    Although he disagreed with everybody else's plans for the project, he could not suggest a more viable plan.
    The boss decided that Mai was the most viable candidate for the job, since she spoke six different languages and had been working longer than the other candidate.
  3. When something or someone is viable, it can live or survive on its own.
    Usually, if a woman has been pregnant for less than 22 weeks, her fetus will not be viable if she gives birth. The fetus would not be able to survive on its own, outside the mother's body.
    The seeds we planted must not have been viable. They never grew into anything.