sometime

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Pronunciation[change]

  • (US) enPR: sŭmʹtīm', IPA: /ˈsʌmˌtaɪm/

Adverb[change]

Positive
sometime

Comparative
none

Superlative
none

  1. You use sometime for a time in the future or the past that is unknown or undecided.
    We should get together sometime soon.
    He must have left sometime after the party started.

Adjective[change]

Positive
sometime

Comparative
none

Superlative
none

  1. (UK) (usually before the noun) A sometime editor, president, minister, etc. is someone who used to be in that position.
    Among those there that day was the sometime editor of the university paper and future editor of the New Statesman, John Lloyd.
  2. (US) (usually before the noun) A sometime actor, friend, teacher, etc. is someone who is not usually in that position.
    Ms. Smith was a teacher and sometime actor who appeared in many TV commercials.

Related words[change]